Trans-Pacific Partnership Negotiations (TPP)

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) among twelve country members, including United States, Canada, Mexico, Peru, Chile, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, Singapore, Brunei, Malaysia and Vietnam.
TPP is a New Generation FTA with board coverage of trade and non-trade matters and high level of commitments.
On February 4th, 2016, TPP was officially signed. Each Party is following its appropriate domestic procedures to ratify the Agreement. TPP is expected to come into force in 2018.
After the US’s withdrawal in January 2017, TPP can not meet enough requirements for enforcement as expected.
In November 2017, Trade ministers from 11 member countries of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) have agreed on core elements of the pact, which is from now on called the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). CPTPP will not to make amendments to the original text but freeze the implementation of some clauses to ensure balance and the quality of the document in the new context. Based on the statement, the TPP members assigned chief negotiators to continue to work on contentious technical issues and conduct legal reviews in preparation for the signing of the pact.